It's all over but the shouting. 1100 and 1105 fail.

It was a heated debate. I am guilty of getting wrapped up in the drama. I admit it. Initiative 1100 pushed me to the limits of reason. I became one of those shouting, super-zealots that I hate. There is room for disagreement. We can discuss our differences without anger, rage and fear. Yep, Initiative 1100 kind of made me forget that. It turned me into one of them.

Now it is all over. Or is it? My stance has always been that the state should not be in the liquor business. The first time I remember debating the issue I was still in college and George Michael was still in Wham! Make no mistake; I am in favor of privatizing liquor sales. It’s just that I was not in favor of doing it in the manner prescribed by either 1100 or 1105.

I want change but, like most of you, I am guilty of not putting enough pressure on Olympia. That stops now. I want things to change in a manner that is most beneficial to the local brewing industry that I love and the good people of Washington as a whole. I’ve learned my lesson and I will be heard.

I don’t want to ramble and start arguments. There’s been enough of that. I just want to say that the Washington Beer Blog hereby pledges to do what we can to push the state legislature towards privatizing the liquor industry in a reasonable and responsible manner. Furthermore, we will work with the Washington Brewers Guild and anyone else that wants to see our antiquated liquor laws modernized in a safe, responsible and beneficial way.

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I’m not sure how much the Washington Beer Blog can affect anything. I’m not a fool. I am just one man and this is just one blog.

I don’t care what some people say. This government is mine and it is not for sale. I do not have millions of dollars to craft an initiative. I do not have fat cat lobbyists knocking on doors in Olympia. When I call my congressman, they send me to voicemail. I am just one man and this is just one blog.

But I will be heard.

8 comments

  1. I’m right there with you, Kendall. They both were poorly written bills. I’m actually surprised (but very happy) that they failed!

  2. Well, I was for 1100, but willing to have a healthy, friendly debate with anyone .. especially over a cool, craft beer.

    I like craft beer and I like competition (i.e. initiative 1100), the later probably put me in opposition to the Brewer’s Guild (i.e. union, lobby, protectionism ..)

    I am also a consumer and home-brewer, so I don’t have a business to support (protect).

    I had a heated, spirited discussion on all this at the “Super-deli-mart” in West Seattle and their support of 1105.

    Fortunately, I had a craft beer in hand, sampling. It made the whole discussion go down much more easily. 🙂

    Cheers !

  3. The state absolutely needs to come up with a plan of getting out of the booze business. If they do not it will be pushed upon them by initiative again (and again) and eventually it will pass. If the state is proactive in the matter it can be done in an organized fashion and with minimal revenue impact.

  4. I grew up in Michigan, and while the state acted as the wholesaler for distilled spirits, it did not operate any liquor stores. But there was a much better selection of liquor from Michigan stores, they didn’t say no to anything, just pay the tax and wholesale fees. But you could buy Jim Bean in KMart, so there wasn’t that much regulation.

    I would love to see the current set of stores privatized. Put each one up for bid, pending license approval. Limit the number of stores any one person or entity can own to three or four. No chain stores, but mom and pops.

    You got my support Kendall!

  5. I voted yes 1100 no 11o5. Im not upset that I lost because I saw so many brewers adamantly against it. I am glad the brewers are happy! But you can bet with the race so close for 1100, that its sure to be on the ballot again in 2 years.

  6. I too was for 1100 and against 1105. For the small brewers like me, especially those who self distribute, and those who would like to make a reasonable run in the craft distillery market, 1100 would have been very beneficial. It may have been harder on those who think they can only make it in the grocery stores but there would have been many other opportunities. I also have a beer and wine specialty shop. Smaller shops could specialize again and have a chance of survival selling the products that the BIG guys snub. That is how it all started anyway isn’t it?

Comments are closed.

It’s all over but the shouting. 1100 and 1105 fail.

It was a heated debate. I am guilty of getting wrapped up in the drama. I admit it. Initiative 1100 pushed me to the limits of reason. I became one of those shouting, super-zealots that I hate. There is room for disagreement. We can discuss our differences without anger, rage and fear. Yep, Initiative 1100 kind of made me forget that. It turned me into one of them.

Now it is all over. Or is it? My stance has always been that the state should not be in the liquor business. The first time I remember debating the issue I was still in college and George Michael was still in Wham! Make no mistake; I am in favor of privatizing liquor sales. It’s just that I was not in favor of doing it in the manner prescribed by either 1100 or 1105.

I want change but, like most of you, I am guilty of not putting enough pressure on Olympia. That stops now. I want things to change in a manner that is most beneficial to the local brewing industry that I love and the good people of Washington as a whole. I’ve learned my lesson and I will be heard.

I don’t want to ramble and start arguments. There’s been enough of that. I just want to say that the Washington Beer Blog hereby pledges to do what we can to push the state legislature towards privatizing the liquor industry in a reasonable and responsible manner. Furthermore, we will work with the Washington Brewers Guild and anyone else that wants to see our antiquated liquor laws modernized in a safe, responsible and beneficial way.

sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor
sponsor

I’m not sure how much the Washington Beer Blog can affect anything. I’m not a fool. I am just one man and this is just one blog.

I don’t care what some people say. This government is mine and it is not for sale. I do not have millions of dollars to craft an initiative. I do not have fat cat lobbyists knocking on doors in Olympia. When I call my congressman, they send me to voicemail. I am just one man and this is just one blog.

But I will be heard.



8 comments

  1. I’m right there with you, Kendall. They both were poorly written bills. I’m actually surprised (but very happy) that they failed!

  2. Well, I was for 1100, but willing to have a healthy, friendly debate with anyone .. especially over a cool, craft beer.

    I like craft beer and I like competition (i.e. initiative 1100), the later probably put me in opposition to the Brewer’s Guild (i.e. union, lobby, protectionism ..)

    I am also a consumer and home-brewer, so I don’t have a business to support (protect).

    I had a heated, spirited discussion on all this at the “Super-deli-mart” in West Seattle and their support of 1105.

    Fortunately, I had a craft beer in hand, sampling. It made the whole discussion go down much more easily. 🙂

    Cheers !

  3. The state absolutely needs to come up with a plan of getting out of the booze business. If they do not it will be pushed upon them by initiative again (and again) and eventually it will pass. If the state is proactive in the matter it can be done in an organized fashion and with minimal revenue impact.

  4. I grew up in Michigan, and while the state acted as the wholesaler for distilled spirits, it did not operate any liquor stores. But there was a much better selection of liquor from Michigan stores, they didn’t say no to anything, just pay the tax and wholesale fees. But you could buy Jim Bean in KMart, so there wasn’t that much regulation.

    I would love to see the current set of stores privatized. Put each one up for bid, pending license approval. Limit the number of stores any one person or entity can own to three or four. No chain stores, but mom and pops.

    You got my support Kendall!

  5. I voted yes 1100 no 11o5. Im not upset that I lost because I saw so many brewers adamantly against it. I am glad the brewers are happy! But you can bet with the race so close for 1100, that its sure to be on the ballot again in 2 years.

  6. I too was for 1100 and against 1105. For the small brewers like me, especially those who self distribute, and those who would like to make a reasonable run in the craft distillery market, 1100 would have been very beneficial. It may have been harder on those who think they can only make it in the grocery stores but there would have been many other opportunities. I also have a beer and wine specialty shop. Smaller shops could specialize again and have a chance of survival selling the products that the BIG guys snub. That is how it all started anyway isn’t it?

Comments are closed.