Another Washington brewery now canning its beer

We recently reported that 7 Seas Brewing was the first Washington craft brewery to offer its beer in cans. Well, today we are reporting that another Washington brewery has followed suit. Sort of. Pyramid Brewing announced today that their award-winning Haywire Hefeweizen is now available in 16 oz. cans. It’s a limited release (May through July).

The subject of Pyramid’s status as a Washington brewery is a matter of much conversation. While they produce the vast majority of their beer elsewhere, there’s no arguing that the company headquarters are right here in Seattle. When Pyramid wins a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival (like they did last year), they chalk it up as a medal for Washington. Regardless of whether we consider them a Washington brewery, it seems the rest of the world does. That’s okay, I suppose.

Here’s the press release from Pyramid.

SEATTLE, WA – April 27, 2010 – The standard by which all other wheat beers are judged is making an informal summer tour beyond the tap and bottle. Pyramid Breweries introduces its gold medal Haywire Hefeweizen in a limited-release 16oz can.

Available from May – July, the new package offering presents a tower of refreshing wheat ale that’s sized for a thirsty time of year. Versatile and easy to chill, the new Haywire can is perfect for warm weather adventures and gatherings where glass need not tread.

“A beer this good deserves to go anywhere,” said Mike Brown, Commissioner of Inspiration and Aspiration for Pyramid Breweries. “Backcountry camping, paddling trips, music festivals, golf courses. Haywire in a can is ideal for all the places Pyramid drinkers celebrate summer’s best in the company of great friends and great beer.”

Haywire is a deliciously deranged American-Style Hefeweizen and an award-winning take on the Bavarian classic. This refreshingly unfiltered wheat ale delivers a distinctively smooth flavor worth sharing with friends. At the 2009 Great American Beer Festival – the largest national beer competition recognizing the most outstanding beers produced in the United States today – Pyramid’s Haywire Hefeweizen was awarded the gold medal for best American-Style Wheat Beer with Yeast.

HAYWIRE HEFEWEIZEN

Availability: May – July, 16oz can
Style:
Hefeweizen
Malts:
2-Row, Malted Wheat, Caramel
Hops:
Nugget and Liberty
ABV:
5.2%
IBU:
18

The 16oz Haywire is a tall can for a short season, and can be found exclusively in the Seattle and Southern California markets. Joining the vast line-up of ways to enjoy Haywire – on draft, in 12oz bottles (available in 6-packs, 12-packs, and in all Pyramid Variety packs) and 22oz bottles – Haywire cans will be available for sale in 4-packs at major retailers.



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12 comments

  1. Kendall – I think you are right, the general consensus is that they are a WA brewer. They started as Hart Brewing back in the 80s in good ole Washington. After Magic Hat bought them, they decided to keep the HQ right here in Seattle.

    thanks for the article.

    Doug @ BeerBlotter.com

  2. Kendall – I think you are right, the general consensus is that they are a WA brewer. They started as Hart Brewing back in the 80s in good ole Washington. After Magic Hat bought them, they decided to keep the HQ right here in Seattle.

    thanks for the article.

    Doug @ BeerBlotter.com

  3. I gotta agree, FAIL on “the standard for which wheat beers are judged”….. I guess the rest of the world considers them a WA brewer, perhaps mass perception fail? regardless I hope we see more actual WA brewers going to cans

  4. The Magic Hat thing was simple. What about Hart Brewing and the whole Thomas Kemper affair? Ouch. And then, well, any time breweries start to work on IPOs instead of IPAs, it gets messy. It’s been a wild ride. George Hancock must feel like one of them bull-riding cowboys. My point? Pyramid’s history is certainly deeply rooted in the Washington craft beer annals, regardless of what’s going on with them these days.

  5. Something about not brewing one single barrel of beer in Washington State makes me think it’s not a Washington brewery. Correct me if I’m wrong, but the SoDo brewery doesn’t produce beer anymore right?

  6. Something about not brewing one single barrel of beer in Washington State makes me think it’s not a Washington brewery. Correct me if I’m wrong, but the SoDo brewery doesn’t produce beer anymore right?

  7. Yes Kevin, that is always the question about Pyramid. Last I heard, they were brewing at least one seasonal beer per year at the Seattle brewery. It’s a mother-beautiful brewhouse. Hate to think it is entirely for show. Whenever I have asked, I’ve been told some form of “Yes, we still brew some beer here.”

    In official press releases and the like, Pyramid states, “With breweries in Seattle, WA, Portland, OR, and Berkeley, CA, the Company owns Alehouses at all three locations as well as two additional Pyramid Alehouses in Walnut Creek and Sacramento, CA.”

  8. Yes Kevin, that is always the question about Pyramid. Last I heard, they were brewing at least one seasonal beer per year at the Seattle brewery. It’s a mother-beautiful brewhouse. Hate to think it is entirely for show. Whenever I have asked, I’ve been told some form of “Yes, we still brew some beer here.”

    In official press releases and the like, Pyramid states, “With breweries in Seattle, WA, Portland, OR, and Berkeley, CA, the Company owns Alehouses at all three locations as well as two additional Pyramid Alehouses in Walnut Creek and Sacramento, CA.”

  9. Pyramid pretty much jumped the shark for me when they changed their pain ol’ Hef, to HAYWIRE Hef.

    …and the less said about “AUDACIOUS APRICOT” the better…

  10. Pyramid pretty much jumped the shark for me when they changed their pain ol’ Hef, to HAYWIRE Hef.

    …and the less said about “AUDACIOUS APRICOT” the better…

Comments are closed.